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Sealaska Invests $1.5 Million in Silviculture Treatments in 2009

July 14th, 2009 Posted By: Morgan Howard No Comments


sealaska_logo_v9.gifJuneau, Alaska— Sealaska Corporation is investing $1.5 million in silviculture treatments on its lands
in Southeast, Alaska in 2009, creating over 40 jobs in rural communities.  Sealaska is the Native
regional corporation for Southeast and a large landowner in the region. The company’s natural
resources department has been providing management and forestry services, known as “silviculture”,
since 1993.

“By providing silviculture on Sealaska’s land and providing the service to other landowners, Sealaska
has gained extensive experience in delivering silviculture treatments, restoration, riparian
management and young-growth forest planning from Dixon Entrance to Chichagof Island,” said Ron
Wolfe, Sealaska natural resources manager.

President Obama’s economic stimulus programs, also known as the American Recovery and
Reinvestment Act (ARRA), is providing funds to create new jobs and to help rural communities
through the recession.  Sealaska believes that there are significant opportunities to use stimulus
funds to enhance young growth forest stands in Southeast Alaska according to Chris E. McNeil, Jr.,
Sealaska president and CEO. “Increasing silviculture in the region is good for the environment and
essential to strengthening the region’s economy. It can immediately create new jobs, especially in the
region’s rural communities.”

“Investment in the health of our young forests is an obligation of land managers to future generations
and is a way to recognize Native values and traditions of both utilizing and revering the land,” said Dr.
Rosita Worl, Sealaska board vice chair and chair of Sealaska’s Lands Committee. “We are the
indigenous people of this region and have a connection to all the land of Southeast. The combination
of our experience and tribal values guide us to promote and participate in developing healthy lands in
both the private and public sectors.”

Silviculture work primarily consists of pre-commercial thinning, tree planting and basal pruning. The
natural reforestation in the region can result in dense young growth stands. By thinning the stands
down tree diameter growth is accelerated and the diversity of forest floor plant growth is enhanced.

Tree planting is not normally necessary in the region but is conducted in defined areas where
regeneration may not occur due to competition from brush growth.

Basal pruning is the process of removing lower limbs on young trees to enhance the quality of the
wood and to promote sunlight penetration to the forest floor.

“Sealaska has the model and capacity to compete for ARRA contracts and to offer quality services to
a broader group of clients,” said McNeil.

###

Sealaska Corporation
Natural Resource Department Facts

Since 1993 Sealaska has conducted the following silviculture activity in the region:

Pre‐commercially
thinned
over
35,000
acres

Hand
planted
over
1.6
million
seedlings
on
more
than
8,320
acres

Basal
pruned
1,050
acres

Restoration
management
of
more
than
eight
miles
of
anadromous
fish
streams

Restoration
management
and
enhancement
of
more
than
500
acres
of
wildlife
habitat

Current activity scheduled for 2009 on Sealaska lands:

Pre‐commercial
thinning
of
3,400
acres

Hand
planting
more
than
40,000
seedlings

Basal
pruning
of
more
than
480
acres

Core cultural and tribal values guiding Sealaska management:
• Haa
Aaní
–
Revering
the
land
and
utilizing
the
land
• Haa
Shagóon
–
Current
generation
tie
to
past
and
responsibilities
to
future
generations.

Additional information about Sealaska’s land management and silviculture programs can be found at
www.sealaska.com. To contract with Sealaska for land management and silviculture services contact
Ron Wolfe, Sealaska natural resources manager, at 907.586.1512.

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